US Army Corps of Engineers
Pittsburgh District

Engineers inspect dewatered lock at Morgantown

U.S. Army Corps Engineers PIttsburgh District
Published Nov. 18, 2014
Robert Burstynowicz, a district structural engineer, inspects one of two miter gate leaves at the upstream end of the 84 ft x 600 ft chamber.

Robert Burstynowicz, a district structural engineer, inspects one of two miter gate leaves at the upstream end of the 84 ft x 600 ft chamber.

Bob Szemanski, a district maintenance mechanical supervisor, examines a valve inside the dewatered land wall culvert.

Bob Szemanski, a district maintenance mechanical supervisor, examines a valve inside the dewatered land wall culvert.

Some Pittsburgh District personnel got a rare glimpse at a dewatered lock when they took part in an inspection of the repairs at Morgantown Lock, Oct. 28.

Normally you would have to be a diver to see the bottom of the chamber, the gate sills, and filling ports, but all were visible on foot during the inspection of the dewatered lock. 

While the lock is dewatered, the repair party is working on the miter gate sills and electrical work within the gallery. 

The Corps’ Dam Safety Program requires that an inspection be conducted when a structure is dewatered and features that are usually submerged are visible.  The lock, located near Morgantown, West Virginia on the Monongahela River has only been dewatered three times since its completion in 1950. The last time was in 1994.